Mizuno Wave Run – 16K of concrete

My step-back week is currently every fourth week and involves less running, more cross-training and a long-run of 10 miles maximum. So I thought I would take the opportunity to check-out the Kuala Lumpur running scene and signed up for the Mizuno Wave 16K in Putrajaya 🙂 There’s easy access to KL (via Air Asia flights) from Miri, just over the Brunei border and Purtajaya is a separate town to the South of KL. The weekend also happened to be my 5th wedding anniversary, so my hubby and I combined a long weekend away, some nice meals, catching up with friends, sight-seeing and shopping, with the running race on Sunday.

The previous week had not gone well. During the Wednesday cross-training session, I had completed my 30 minute core/glute work-out and was merrily cycling away on the turbo trainer, when I experienced a sickening ‘pop’ in my right ankle like my Achilles had been hit with a hammer. You would have thought I’d stop immediately, right? Nope! I slowed my RPM, waited for further signs of pain but as there were none, I carried on and completed my 45 min session. It wasn’t until I dismounted that my right leg seemed locked and I couldn’t put my weight on it. After some bum-shuffling downstairs, raised leg, ice and herbal remedies plus a day in heels (I couldn’t walk in barefeet without a dull bruised feeling) followed by a day in MBT trainers where my foot felt fine but tired, I was back to normal. How? I don’t know how. But I decided to collect my tee-shirt and race-number anyway, seeing as I’d paid the entry fee. Note the personalisation of my running forum name “Nywanda”. Sure beats them trying to squeeze my very long real name on the tiny wee bib 🙂P1000661

I spent Friday traipsing about in airports and the local shopping mall – Alamanta followed by an amazing Italian dinner with champagne and a singing group performing at the table. Then on Saturday I had a massage, courtesy of the Marriott IOI resort and felt great. We walked around all day Saturday in the main shopping area, had tea round at a friends and then more shopping into the evening where we met friends for dinner. The foot didn’t feel any the worse for wear, so I decided I would try and run and if there was any pain, well, I could always walk or stop….no big deal. The main goal remains as The Most Beautiful Thing 25K (or ~30K if you believe the route map) in September, although I do have some distance races between now and then, foot health withstanding.

We had met with a very fast looking gent from Greece the day before and shared a cab back from the race-pack collection. We managed to meet up with him again prior to the start at 06:30 in Presint 2. With only 2 out of 3 toilets working near the start, I only just made it to the loo with a slightly queasy tummy before the race started. I obviously started way too far back as we all walked in formation over the start-line and the chip timing shows I have a 3.5 min deficit between gun-time and chip-time. I MUST remember this for future races and avoid weaving through the Screen%20Shot%202013-05-29%20at%204_25_58%20PMcrowd (especially as the change in direction does nothing to help my unstable ankle). The route was through a concrete jungle of government buildings including the Palace of Justice and although there were some nice views over the river and towards the bridge, I kept my eyes focussed on the camber of the road and stayed tuned in to almost every footfall. The water stations were completely overwhelmed with runners when I arrived and I ended up scrabbling for water from the wrong side of the table; there were way too many runners for that one little fold-out picnic bench and the volunteers were frantic. It was every man and women for themselves as I had to almost elbow my way back onto the course! I was a bit hacked off at the amount of “cutters” but by the second water station I had chilled out enough to concentrate on doing my own race, over the full distance and not worry about anyone taking short-cuts. (It IS one of my bug-bears though).

Due to my own sweatiness at the start, I had accidentally pressed YES when the Garmin asked me if I was indoors, so I had no GPS tracking to help with pacing. I was however wearing my heart-rate monitor so I just used that to try and keep steady- let a little rise happen on the uphills and had the following distance splits:

5K= 28.16 / 10K= 58.43 / 16K = 1.38.45 (Official results pending). I struggled a bit near the end as we came over the last bridge, I was feeling drained from having no breakfast and only 1/2 bottle of Gatorade out on the course. With heavy legs I managed a 200m surge at the end and must have passed at least 8 people including two ladies! I have noticed that not many people around my current pace bother with a sprint finish, so I was doubled up at the end whereas everyone around me looked really fresh.

I didn’t get a powerade bar which I was really in need of, just a bottle of water, a box of cereal (random!), a sachet of local brand deep-heat and a very nice shiny medal. I was careful to do some stretches and soak up some of the race atmosphere. I was especially happy to find out that our new friend had indeed been fast and come second overall! I would have congratulated him but he went off for a 12K run before prize-giving. Some folk! Well done MichaelIMG-20130612-03387

For now, I can only focus on keeping the ankle stretched and protected, as I come into the longest distance training segment leading up to the marathon in July and ultra-marathon in August. Next week all being well – 18 mile long-run, hill-work on the roads and…..a physio session.

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Extra Zeds – back to back long runs

I really need more sleep. This week I’ve been forced to remember how difficult it is to do back to back runs and exist in the land of the living. A couple of days I have found beforeHarrisHalfmyself sitting in front of the laptop with my eye-balls rolling back in my head, fighting to stay awake. If I loiter anywhere for too long, I find my body starts to shutdown and urges me to catch a few zeds! Pass the Yerba Maté …….Zzzzzzz

All quite normal as I am asking my body to run between 3 and 4 hours, followed by 2 hours with only 10 hours sleep in-between. When I write it like that, it seems ludicrous! But this is what week 3, 4 & 5 has entailed, so just as well I’m facing a step-back week where my longest run will barely be in double figure mileage.

As a reward for the longer runs, I treated myself to an aromatherapy 90 minute massage to pummel out those weary muscles. And some new ‘incentives’ from Sportpursuit. I’m so good to myself, you’d think I’d try harder.

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So this is what I’ve been up to over the last few weeks, working towards The Mauritius Marathon, which will be my longest training run for the Speyside way ultramarathon in August and The Most Beautiful Thing in September.

Week 3: Long run 27K, 2 x 5Ks, jungle hash, HIIT and reformer Pilates

P1000465Week 4: back to back runs of 5 miles, 9 miles,10 miles (38K) plus HIIT and Pilates.

One of these runs was run along the beach wearing full length Salomon EXO compression tights. Although I’m sure my legs liked the additional support it was WAY too hot and the extra burden of running in sand and having to navigate beach debris and river inlets meant it felt a lot longer than it was. My Achilles was really stiff afterwards but following the piriformis exercises, I had absolutely no repercussions for my 10 miler the next day 🙂

Week 5: back to back runs of 5 miles, 18 miles, 5 miles (45K) plus HIIT and Pilates

and then this coming week is a step-back or drop-down week, with a cheeky wee 10 mile race called the Mizuno Wave Run near Kuala Lumpur. I have so far been really impressed by the organisation, local hospitality and excellent quality of race goodies provided by the Far East’s Road racing circuit. Let’s hope this one maintains the standard. I need to get back to the jungle hash though, as the terrain training will really benefit the hillier part of SSW as well as the overall conditions of TMBT.

Week 6 – 3 miles /10 mile race/3 miles (26K) and the shorter runs will be more or lessi_love_plodding_along_mug-rfbae3764c5024b4eb8602fbdb84a62b3_x7jgr_8byvr_152 ‘speed work’ involving 400m reps with short intervals. I can’t really expect my legs to like upping the pace even for these short runs but it’ll be good for them to have a change from all the plodding. If I don’t watch out I’ll be growing donkey-ears 🙂

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“On-On” – Running the Hash

Well!

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I’d been eagerly awaiting the chance to do my first jungle run and rather than thrashing through the nearest mangrove, armed with a machete and leech socks, I coerced a new friend from Seria to bring me to the local ‘hash’. I had been told about the tradition of hashing by DOUG, who was part of the inaugural Hash House harriers (or 3H/HHH) in Kuala Lumpur during an ex-pat posting. On further research, I discovered that Brunei was the very first female-only hash in the world, so all in, it was sounding like a good opportunity (and perhaps the safest option) for exploring the off-road terrain. Read HERE for a bit more info on the Brunei chapter.

With local hash names (given, never designated by the member) like “Yackie fackie”, I didn’t know what to expect from the outing but I made BEN promise not to leave me to be swallowed up by termite mounds, overcome by fire ants, tousled by a bearded pig etc. weehashersThis picture is a bit more akin to the Labi Road hash set-up; you turn onto the 50 Km stretch, which has a cluster of local housing but which gradually gives way to jungle either side. Basically drive until you see a collection of cars randomly parked along the verges and voila! that’s very likely the hash. I had worn head to foot clothing cover. Ben was in shorts n vest! I am far far too tasty to the local fauna to risk that and expecting the odd stumble in highly undulating terrain, I chose baking in the heat over having my blood sucked and believe me, once inside the canopy, the atmosphere was oven-like, as you would expect. We said some hellos and discovered there was another “virgin” there tonight, a first-timer like me.

imagesCAH2H2X9Following roll-call and payment of $5 to cover post-run refreshment 😉 Ben explained a few protocols about registering where you are and if you’re following the right trail. No sooner were we off than the hoots of “on-on” and “on-up” (signifying that the route is ascending) started and boy, there were some calf busting near scrambles! arm jungleI’d been warned to look before I grabbed and I followed this advice as trees and shrubs assisted our movement through the forest. I was toasty in my long sleeve neon top and glad of the Camel bak tee-shirt I had worn underneath, allowing me to drink on the run whilst keeping my hands free. I’d also brought a waist-pack containing gloves, a head-torch and a CLIF bar and I’d worn my Suunto watch and tested out the compass and altimeter quite a few times. I was also very glad of my INOV-8 Roclite’s, which aren’t a kick in the pants different from the authentic wellies (same sole) or rubber sticky outer of the professional hashers gym-shoes. See what you think:

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In total I was in the forest for about 75 minutes and as I was setting the pace for myself and Ben, I ended up notably “off-paper” twice, which was more to do with having found a previous trail (white loo-roll with yellow dots in comparison to this hash, using plain white) and not checking….but that’s why it was great to have an experienced hasher alongside and I’d recommend buddying up with someone sympathetic to your pace, ability and novice status. The paper was draped, mostly at eye-level but sometimes on the ground, usually within glancing distance from the previous markings. Occasionally the path would be scattered with shredded paper. Quite amusing having to examine toilet paper to ascertain the direction  of the hash 🙂 The going was pretty good underfoot, a mix of deep leafy trail, bush, gnarly root systems, crumbly sandy embankments and equally crumbly verticals, trees and leafy undergrowth at all angles and a couple of (thankfully) dryish waterways,

DSC_0236Interestingly enough, after using hill-walking and running techniques including hands on hips and hands on knees to push up through some very steep little sections, my instinct was to break into a jog as soon as I was able and found this really shook off the ascents before the next one was upon us. And I only got one fly in my gob! I was starting to lose my breathe as the compass began registering East, showing that we were on our way towards the road. Following a couple of boggy crossings over make-shift log bridges (I took a slight detour to use a lower, wider, more girly log) and making a couple of easy leaps, very like jumping from one pile of rushes to another when running through wetlands, the clearing came into view.

I was quite tired from continually scanning the ground for over an hour but as we met a hasher walking back down the route, I urged Ben to ‘pretend to sprint’ into the clearing, as if we had been running the whole time. As if! But it was apparent that many of the local hashers had taken a shortcut (which is entirely allowed) and almost everyone was home and already stripped or changed and quaffing a Tiger beer! To a few cheers of “the virgin is back”, I treated myself to an ice-cold 100Plus as the second virgin and the sweeper emerged from the canopy. It seemed like the night was just getting started – as the darkness closed in, a small fire had been built, there was talk of food and the beer buckets were being re-stocked. But we couldn’t stay.

It’s about a 30 minute drive back to Panaga, so we headed off to shouts of “See you next week”. Too right! Although one gent stated that tonight’s was a relatively easy, short one with no check-points [where the front runners have to hunt around for the trail continuation and then mark back towards the cross, for the subsequent slower “hounds”], this hasn’t put me off one bit. I *did* see some rather large ants on my travels but made it home unscathed by The Biters.

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This time 🙂

Kit List: The North Face merino socks, INOV-8 Roclite GTX 212, Sugoi compression tights, Camelbak hydration vest, Long sleeve Neon Brooks top, Ben Fogle Buff, Suunto vector Altimeter, Pete Bland waist-pack (containing) Blueberry CLIF bar, Ron Hill gloves, Petzl Tikka2 headtorch. Cologne of choice: DEET spray called OFF!

Hot weather training – distance running goals

Last week we moved from the temporary accommodation provided by my husbands company, to our new permanent home – a rented terraced townhouse, not unlike the one we left behind in Scotland! What this means as far as training is concerned, is that I now get to have my very own gym, on the top floor, with balcony. The luxury! Well, it’s far from luxurious and is really just a mish-mosh of gear at the moment but I am hoping to pimp it up a bit with mirrors, storage and maybe a barbell. For now, it is functional and allows me to run, cycle, stretch and cross-train: what more could a girl need?

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The treadmill is an inexpensive lesser-known brand Powertech and suits all my current needs; it is very good at dealing with a vast amount of sweat pouring onto it! The cycling set-up is basically a duff old stainless steel framed mountain bike I won as a safety award from Baker Hughes, a new rear road-tyre from Wiggle and a Riva Tesla Turbo-trainer trainer from Sport Pursuit. No proper computer on it but I am training for X duration at < 130 bpm, so I just wear my Garmin Heart-rate monitor and I’m all good.

IMG-20130513-03254I’ve been trying to do the majority of my running outside; only taking to the gym when I had no available time in the cooler hours between 6-8am or 5-7pm. Now that it’s time to start upping the distance towards the 20+ mile mark, I had hoped to run outside for ~2 hours and then finish off the distance inside on the treadmill, although I worried that these later stage miles would not be as affective if they were run in cooler conditions. Not to worry! The top floor of the house has an ambient of 29-33 degC, so although there is an air-conditioning unit in the room, I have been keeping it switched off, thus getting a full “hot climate” work-out!

The furthest I have run in the home-gym has been 10K straight through and one 10 mile session carried out in 5K/6K/5K chunks with a water re-fill in-between. The black fridge/freezer we brought from the UK is now the designated “beer” fridge, which would be fairly incongruent in the gym, save only for the water dispenser in the front! I also keep my electrolye tabs and TORQ fuel in there too.

Because of the high temperatures, the running is slower and I lower and raise the speed on the treadmill or my own pace when outside, to keep my heart-rate constant. Maximum heart-rate is desired as 165 bpm and an average of 140 bpm ideally. I am noting duration, average speed versus heart-rate in my training diary and will be looking for trends in fitness as my mileage and conditioning progresses.

Meanwhile my remaining running goals for 2013 are:

  1. Acclimatise to running in high humidity heats of 30+degC
  2. Remain injury free
  3. Become au fait with off-road jungle terrain

I have ear-marked a few key races for me, which will be a helluva lot of fun but also strategic to these and longer term goals.

  1. Marathon D’ile Maurice (July, Mauritius, 42 Km) – as a training run for (2) and also to try and run under 5 hours in 25+ degC conditions. Plus of course, Mauritius is a beautiful place and will be another island off the bucket-list. It also happens to fall on the weekend before my birthday.
  2. Speyside Way Ultramarathon (August, UK, 58 Km) – determined to finish an ultra without stomach or derrier issues! I completed this last year after a fairly horrendous but also extremely full-filling experience in just under 7.5 hours; I’d like to think I could do something different/ better in 2013.
  3. The Most Beautiful Thing (September, Malaysia, 25-30 Km) – to experience some local hills, valleys, forest and scenery around Kota Kinabalu and associated forests. Officially called Colourcoil TMBT Ultramarathon, the 100K runners who finish in < 30 hours earn 3 points towards UTMB. That means the course is challenging (hence why I’m starting with the short distance, did I say “starting” there? 😉 )

So it’s going to be a fairly intense few months of training, leading up to a few months of eventing (I shake my head when I try and call these “races”). As ever, the planning phase for my training has been intense, profuse, detailed and because I know I am a ‘planner’ by nature, I’ve allowed myself to draw up schedule after schedule, move things around, prescribe every aspect……so now I’m ready to RELAX and commit to my long distance runs as well as a few things which have ‘just happened to come my way’, so I’m not going to knock the Universe on that. So, having said all that, my week looks like this, with a couple of step-back weeks of low intensity for development. I’ve also started incorporating short HIIT and a glutes work-out wherever/whenever I feel like it, which currently, is most days 🙂

Monday – 10 miles (am)

Tuesday – 30-40 minute sprint session with local ladies running club (pm)

Wednesday – jungle hash ( 1-1.5 hours) (pm)

Thursday – MASSAGE (am)

Friday – reformer pilates (am) / bike session (pm)

Saturday – REST

Sunday – long run (various distances)