Week 3 & 4 – Everywhere you go….

…always take the weather with you! A new cold front hit the North East last week and once again, everyone seemed to respond as if it was the first time snow had ever fallen. This extended to the cancellation of quite a few races this passed weekend, including the Brass Monkey Half Marathon in York, which would have been a long run “look see” as to fitness and training progress and slid nicely into Lochaber Marathon training (which I’m no longer in the country for).

Campaign #CheerioFatty continued until the eve of the race and once cancellations had been confirmed, I went all out with a 5 course meal at our Country Manor Hotel & Spa Middlethorpe Hall. The next day there was also “cake”. Whoops. Consequently my plummeting weight has plateaued, probably helped along with no treadmill session due to family commitments and no long run due to race cancellation. Excuses, excuses, still it’s Game (back) On this week.

However, my stats for the clean eating campaign look something like this and I now weigh the least I have weighed, for 6 years:

  • Jan1st- 7th, miles run = 20.38, lbs lost = 5.4 lbs
  • Jan 8th – 14th, miles run = 21.21, lbs lost 4.4 lbs
  • Jan 15th – 21st, miles run = 3.65, lbs lost -1.2 lbs

I’be just received a set of these Tanita body fat monitor/scales and regardless of how accurate they are, they will show relative improvements, so long as I stay hydrated. The weight lost will soon cease to matter and it’ll be about fat: muscle ratio. And while we’re talking about body changes and motivation to change, have a read of this blog Medalslut Regardless of whether you prefer a good cop or bad cop approach, this lady has certainly changed her lifestyle, health and body. Personally, I never notice anyone’s size unless they draw my attention to it first and I’m therefore not a good friend when it comes to congratulating and/or ‘having a quiet word’. I’ve also found a lot of commonality and inspiration from this Fella Ultra-runner Jon Mackintosh

So far I have this result (week 3):-

York-20130119-02403But no discernible running races to see how the weightloss has affected that aspect of my life. So now, with the Half Marathon gone, I search for something else to run before I depart for hotter climes. Unfortunately, I’m starting to feel a bit of a ‘jinx’ coming on and the last few races I have blogged about have been cancelled, so I’ll keep schtum on my last distance target. Meantime, I should make my second appearance at the local park-run as Race director, having just completed a turn in all the other volunteer positions. You’d think I’d know what I was doing by now, alas, I’ll probably still manage to fluff the intro and knacker the results 🙂 Hopefully I’ll get to run a few more as well before I depart. I guess we take  these free local 5Ks for granted and you never know what you’ve got til it’s gone.

Also, please remember to check out my reviews page which is still getting built but I’ve a list of stuff as long as my arm (some still in boxes) to review…first up, the Salomon S-LAB 2013 version of the 12-set; surely one of the Daddy’s of the latest range of rucksacks?

Ciao Bellas.

Advertisements

Christmas week training

So week 2 flew in, as the mayhem of DIY and no working shower at home, melded into the zone of Living Primarilly on Chocolate. Bang goes my easy-diet theory and there appears to be a lot more vegetarian junk food available this year. At least it meant I visited the gym a bit more, to deal with my ever-cumbersome long hair (the over the bath shower head just doeasn’t cut it). The_FabsSeriously, I should just go short. I know I suit it and it would make more sense in the grand scheme of things…….but with an average of 79% humidity(!) I could end up with a Beatles haircut circa 1960s. Men don’t appreciate the nuances of hair maintenance and just how much extra time this could add on to my daily get-ready-for-work routine.

However, the training seems to have gone well. Attempting to run “only” 7 miles in week one was futile and after 8.5 miles (broken up with a cuppa at the gym, with Hamster) at 10.20 min/mile, I realised I would have to concentrate to achieve the required distance at a slow enough pace. Week 2 was slightly worse: 9 miles almost exactly but at 10.05 pace. Although this might not seem particularly speedy, my vdot calcs give me a LSR of 10:40-11.05. However, if I don’t pace-watch, my comfortable pace appears to be 9.45. Go figure. Will I lose out on the benefits of fat-burning if I run too fast or is it just that I’ll be knackered and not able to give my other sessions a decent bash? Time will tell and we’ll see what 11 miles in week three, will bring. I may have an option to have Hamster shouting me back, although as a much speedier runner than I, the slow pace might cause him slow-form injury e.g. if you force yourself to run slower than your own easy pace, you can sometimes cause an injury by a change in form and I’ve often suffered sore toes when forcing a very slow run and haven’t found it particularly easy to change to smaller shorter strides (because I just speed up…). Gah, etc.

The Intervals have thus far proved very manageable. In week 1 my heart-rate went through the roof at 174 BPM after the last 2 (of 6). However this week, my HR levelled at 164 BPM max for the last 3 of 8. I forgot my ipod, which is usually a good companion on the treadmill, but found I was totally “zoned” by the 5th rep! Eager to see what 10 x 400m will bring.

John using the auto-tracker viewing Jupiter near Monymusk

John using the auto-tracker viewing Jupiter near Monymusk

I filed this session under “going great guns” especially having sat eating chocolate round my Aunty Deirdre’s the previous day; enjoying the company so much but took the opportunity to look through Uncle John’s telescope and saw 4 of Jupiters moons, plus 2 distinct planet bands and some incredible detailed moon craters! Astronomy is the new Sega (possibly). But I digress >>>

So, as we near the end of the month, with my two weeks of structured training, my expenditure looks like this:-

ChartImg

I would hope to increase the bike and swim time and next months donut will probably show intervals versus long runs versus easy run commutes.

Week 2 also saw me show up for my first volunteering stint at park-run. I’d been getting a tad hacked off with emailing the RDs and finding there were no slots left on the weeks I could manage because I had been “too late” to volunteer. It now seems there is a problem with my yahoo e-mail which kicks back an undeliverable from the park-run address. Weird as it’s the same Nywanda address I use for all my on-line ordering and that seems to work fine. I still haven’t done registration, so I’ve put my hat in for that in a few weeks time and then I will have done every position, including race director. Puts me in good stead for maybe cajoling interest in a Bandar Seri Brunei PR event 😉 I will have to do RD and back-up timer duties again though, to make sure I know how to load the software etc as Hamster did it for me last time :-OP100007hamster b

Talking of park-run: FiWright gets her “50” teeshirt this Saturday and I hope to attend my 4th PR location (others so far are Glasgow Strathclyde and Belfast Victoria) by running Ediniburgh next weekend to see her receive this recognition and also run at Aberdeen this Tuesday for the NYD event. No PB attempt for me but it’ll be nice to see where I’m at on an eighty% effort (wind & rain dependant). Park run is so good for gauging progress and I haven’t run it since August(!!) when I got a long overdue sub 25 min 5K (and yeah, I know, I really should be loads under that, yet I just can’t find the motivation to get into the hurt-zone). www.parkrun.org.uk

P.S. Still no sign of the Salomon back-pack or purple Nike Lunarglide+ 4s I ordered direct from the manufacturer 😦

Interim running and a squibbly lens

This weekends run took in some nice wee hills round the local hill range known as Bennachie, where I did a New Years’ run almost 3 years ago, to celebrate being sober at Hogmanay for the first time since my early teens 😉

Ah, sobriety ties nicely with running and training; so what if I have to be on-the-wagon for Hoggers. It’s nice to be able to remember everything and then drive home at the end of the night. I’m not sure where this year’s Xmas and New Years day routes will take me: last year I made my way round a country road which normally would be too treacherous with 60 mph traffic. It was great being out there, practically on my own. New Years day I went to the local park and saw a purple-legged runner in shorts, despite the snow. Happy times.

My ‘point and press’ approach to photography has been getting me down a bit; the camera on the phone is good but not responsive enough and I’ve missed mony a scrumptious sunset or cloud pattern fiddling about (accidentally) with autotag. So I am hoping I will find a small but decent /proper camera in my Xmas stocking this year (although the official line is not to buy anything or if you have to, buy something consumable, so we have less to pack and move. I am looking forward to back-to-back bubble baths, eating chocolate and drinking tea in order to use up this prophetic bounty).

I’ve also been doing some town running and capturing things from around the city which I thought were interesting and which the ordinary man might not look at twice. A lot more journeys a la pied due to being a one car family at the moment, so when OH is in the office and I’m not, I have taken to packing a bum-bag and just getting on with my business. It sure beats traffic queues and parking issues both figuratively and sometimes literally. I even interviewed a potential employee in my running gear!

As Xmas approaches, so too does the decision on whether to start a training regime knowing that I will likely be living in another country by the end of it. I have an entry for the Brass Monkey half, which will more likely be a Fetch-fest social than an actual realistic attempt at a PB. I also have an entry for Lochaber marathon which Ms Jupp kinda made me enter on the premise that I could jog round and eat sarnies at the back with her. However, we’ll likely be gone by March so that is another (insert entry fee) which I won’t see again but it doesn’t mean I shouldn’t do some training. Well, so long as the achilles doesn’t get any more painful, I might well start a 16 week programme and try and get my weight down a bit. This is the best time of year for me because I don’t eat turkey dinners and I don’t like a lot of stuff like Xmas pudding or mince pies 😉

A couple of new additions to the Nywanda catalogue of sports goods (yes, yes, I really should get round to proper reviews, I know, I know…..). The X-bionic range continues to be a favourite; not exactly flattering unless you’ve got washboard abs but you actually notice the difference in temperature regulation which is brilliant for someone like me who is prone to over-heating but then cooling rapidly as soon as I stop. I am loving the padded shoulder area of the Trekking top and I get a really decent fit from the men’s small.

With new seasonal colours and an ever-expanding and (to me) at times confusing range of INOV-8s, I’ve actually sniffed out a bargain replacement pair of Roclites for £25 which are the exact same model I first bought in complete ignorance of the brand in 2009, but which worked out brilliantly – see Teal 282s above.inov8shoe2 I say confusing for the barefoot/ road range with the transitional 4-0 arrows but then some of the F-lites are 2 arrows but the road shoes are called barefoot and some are transitional and I’m not even aspiring to become a forefoot striker (implode), ah, frak it, I went for the Purple Ones 😉

The 2013 edition of the Salomon S-Lab 12 set is out and they’ve slashed 40g from the weight AND added new features. All of which means the “bog standard” 12 is now discounted and voila, Trekinn will soon be furnishing me with an upgrade from the XA20 which has done me proud on longer runs, but which is becoming a bit tattered around the zip. I am very excited about this but will not be “breaking it out” until I have relocated. Something to look forward to. In the meantime, I am chucking out and rehoming any/all winter running gear and excess rucksacks. How many fleeces does one girl need? 🙂

SKIN_PACK_12_hi_37474

Fall running with a Fell-runner

You would think that if you were going to rise at the arse end of dawn and drive two and a half hours to do a run, that it would be fairly important to remember to bring your running shoes?

Well, no: don’t remember to pack your running shoes (choosing from a wide selection of INOV-8 Roclite’s talons and GTX versions……) and don’t even risk it and turn back once you do remember, for fear of being late. Just resign yourself to wearing your Salomon XA “shoes” which are ½ size too big and are generally reserved for kicking about in because they hurt your feet to run in.

So that was the great start to the day, rising at 6 a.m. eating a bagel with jam and promising to eat more on the way down but not managing to. Journey planning and not using the Google map print outs and then losing faith in your ability to follow road signs, thus using the Satnav (which just confirmed you were right).

However, I arrived in Pitlochry ahead of schedule so I drove around the town and finally parked up and used the loo in the local Co-op. My knee was stupidly stiff from all the gear changing (mad other side of the road driving to avoid road-works and ramps) and I generally just felt a bit radge. I unpacked my rucksack and futered until nearer 10 a.m. and then I texted my running partner to inform her where I was. Was it lucky that I had passed on my car reggy, as she had forgotten her phone and wasn’t it also lucky that she had a spare pair of offroad Salomon S-Labs in my exact size? Indeed!

I met the dogs (3 off) and we drove to a small forest carpark off an estate beside Moulin. A slight splash of rain and a brief tryst with a couple who didn’t like dogs (isn’t it great how pets always know which people hate them and then overcompensate trying to win them over?) and we were off up the burnside path. I soon had to adopt a walk due to well, not being very fit and actually I felt a bit white n weak, information I quickly passed on incase I passed out. This nausea disappeared as quickly as it had arrived and later, I put this down to having not eaten enough before setting off. But it was nice terrain and we chatted when the ascent wasn’t too arduous – thankfully the route was between two hills and not up the local hill Ben Vrackie. Maybe next time!

Ben Vrackie in the background

The moors offered a rocky descent and I really enjoyed the views as well as the chance to do some running (as opposed to bimbling or walking). I usually let my mind wander when I’m out in the country so it was a different experience to be running with someone else and a small dog. The dog had this endearing way of tripod-running by folding a hind-leg up towards the belly and hopping quickly with the remaining foot. As the sheep covered moors faded into farm-land, we took a path onto a country road and headed towards the River Tummel.

The weather stayed dry and the scenery was stunning, everywhere we went there were picture opportunities but I tried to commit most to memory and minimised the use of the phone camera! [Yep, these pics really are taken with my whiteberry].The road running was slightly jarring in the off-road shoes but it was a treat to get a “free trial” of broken in trail shoes and I have apparently been wearing the wrong size. these fitted perfectly and my feet only really hurt near the end of the run, when we returned to Pitlochry via the A947 pavements. The next part of the route was on woodland trail which skirted the river and dipped and fell alongside some beautiful water features. This was the time I felt the best during the run and managed to open up a few times, although I was tracking the run via the Motorola MotoACTV on a clip and had stuffed it into my waistpack, so had no idea of pace or distance at that point. We veered in to view a local spot where legend had it that Rob Roy leapt to escape pursuers; but on trying to google it for more info, I couldn’t find anything on tinternet, so it presumably can’t be that well known a legend! Hmmm maybe it wasn’t Rob Roy……

It was during this final stage of the trail run, on undulating ground, that I realised I was running low on water and was feeling tired and hungry. Whilst viewing a local bungee jump point I unfortunately let my own feet get caught up with some gnarly tree-trunks and I took a flyer (without a bungee). Landing on my knee and hand, I ungracefully rolled sidewards but got up with only an “Oof” to draw attention to my plight. I guess falling is all part of running and my run-partner waited unperturbed whilst I recomposed myself for the return leg into Pitlochry. Some more chat about whether training with less water might break me of my “comfort blanket” (I tend to carry water with me for anything over a 10K and anytime I haven’t I’ve always felt my performance was impaired……)

The conversation went back and forth, with me gleaning lots of tips and interesting factoids, no more so than that the sheer nature of hill and fell-running can mean that those athletes who undertake the challenge and travel far and wide, can be somewhat solitary by nature. And private. I think that this aspect of the hills and running there, is what appeals to me (because it certainly isn’t the talent I have for covering the terrain with speed or dexterity). You can’t hide from the land, the elements, the effort required to pass over the Earth and you don’t need to be anything other than what or who you are. Because the hills don’t really care! There aren’t many things you can say that of, in life and living in society can require a certain pantomime. The one characteristic which I really wasn’t prepared for was the lack of an ego, something which is normally associated with talent and achievement. I don’t think I have ever met someone with so little concern for anything other than doing the best that can be done and avoiding the hamster-wheel of commodity living. Probably the most admirable trait I’ve seen in anyone because I know it’s one I’ll never achieve. Even this blog is a token of crass look-at-me-ism and for that I do apologise. However, as the day progressed, I did take heed of the fact that I have still been running a relatively short period of time and that trail running is not easy! I know I am often too judgemental of myself and frustrated, nae, embarassed by my lack of prowess. Running is very enjoyable regardless of ability and I assume that is why a world-class fell and sky-runner was willing to give up a day of her life to (a) a charity auction resulting in (b) a bimble about with a sloth-paced stranger 🙂 Afterwards we reached Pitlochry (running between the tourists, in front of whiskey shops, tartan shops, tea-rooms), we drove back to the car-park, changed and picked up the other car and the dogs who had remained behind. We found a small teashop (which wasn’t jam-packed with retired tourists) and I asked them for “something chocolate” and was presented with my full order: “lashings” of tea, orange juice, water and a huge slice of chocolate crispy! It was much needed and sustained me until the real meal of the day: chicken pie at the Lairhillock Restaurant. We parted after a quick hello to the dogs (I soooo want a furry running partner), who were going to get a walk up Ben Vrackie that afternoon and me? I headed home via a lovely detour, which saw me breathing in as I drove passed an articulated lorry on a single track road, with me on balanced on the sloped side(!). Memories in place, managed to not be too Fan-Girl (I hope) and a resolve to chill out a little bit about what should or shouldn’t be happening in my So Called Running. I’ve a lot to be grateful for and days like today make the crappy ones fade. Happy and looking for pins to deflate my own sense of self-importance 😉

Next long run will be Bennachie range Gordon Trail, back via Oxen Craig. Hills but on my own and in my own shoes.

Spey-side Way Ultra Recces

I don’t know why I entered this ultra; I won’t be at anywhere near the distance training I was for last years Glen Ogle race, which was ‘only’ 32 ish miles and as my first foray into the above-marathon distance, I was really just jogging to get round, with no real prep or strategy other than “don’t bust anything”. Which I managed. But I had most of my marathon training under my belt including a couple of 20 something milers.

So at 36.5 miles with a decent climb in the middle and some deceptive gradual ascents, the Speyside Way wasn’t exactly the obvious choice for an event, especially the week after a fast Half Marathon. I had previously agreed to buddy round a couple of stages and support a fellow forumite at the Checkpoints, seeing as I would have completed the UTLD 50, three weeks beforehand. However, with Lakelands 50 recorded as a DNS, this was my fall back event and the buddy is no longer taking part.

If you look up the term “naively stupid” in the local running dictionary, you’ll see a picture of me conceiving that the Speyside Way is easy compared to the Lake District……the reality was very different and we all know that no ultra is really easy.

I decided to make my long run training for the half marathon, into recces of the SSW route. If I can’t be distance prepared, I can be terrain aware at the very least. So I entered SSW ultra (the race director Sarah is one of the ladies I met at the Cape Wrath Challenge in 2010, with her family; her mother was an especially lovely supporter) and I am starter 65.

Recce 1: Ballindalloch to Craigellachie (12.5 miles)

Well, we couldn’t find an extraction point at Craigellachie so we drove to Aberlour to find the visitors centre closed at the weekend (just when tourists might want information: how unhelpful), but the SSW was well signposted so I opted for 10 miles and got dropped at Ballindalloch with camelback (only slightly leaking) and wearing road shoes, for good support.

GEAR: Nike Lunarglide +2, x-socks Run, Haglofs full length intense tights, Haglofs boxers, shockabsorber B4490, Brooks misti long sleeve, Montane featherlite waterproof jacket, Nike hat, Salomon XA20 rucksack and I carried 1.5 L water with elete and Mulekick cherry gels, Garmin 305 Forerunner, 2Gb Nano (shuffled playlist)

Setting off from Ballindalloch, I was soon surprised by the lack of discernible path- this is proper rough field running and I questioned the choice of road shoes, but to be fair, it was quite sturdy under foot despite recent and ongoing drizzly rain. I kept swapping sides to reduce the camber effect. I took a gel after 30 mins and 60 mins with some water and that sat well. The countryside was enjoyable with a few bridges (one which had to be walked as I got a fair shoogle going) and I passed a couple of cyclists, dog walkers and one postman! As I got closer to the visitors centre, I noticed the ‘going was good’ and my pace really picked up through the wooded area; I guess I’ll have to watch I don’t get carried away with this on the day. Back in Aberlour in 1 hr 42 mins although I’d probably allow nearer 2 hours for this during the race. I drank very little of my water allowance but then, I was really well hydrated to start with and wasn’t pushing the pace until nearer the end. I didn’t really feel any issues with the previous injury sites although my right foot felt a bit plantar-ish. Some stretches and a change into fresh clothes because the ankles were well wet and clarted in mud and jobs a good ‘un!

I probably wouldn’t opt for offroad shoes on this section unless it was super-wet on race-day. The great thing about the drop bag option is being able to make terrain specific choices and I’m keen to use off-road shoes only where absolutely necessary and where I’ll end up AOT or turning an ankle of I used shoes with less grip. I need the most support I can in order to protect my weak areas- left calf and right Achilles.

Recce 2: Boat O’ Brig to Craigellachie (~15 miles)

This was meant to be Aberlour to Fochabers, 15 miles according to the SSW sign-posting. However, after being let down by the local taxis who said I’d have to wait 45 mins for them to get a taxi in the area, I took the advice of a very helpful lovely lady in the local running shop. I’d gone in to purchase an OS of the area, just encase (and because the fog and rain were really quite bad) and ended up telling Scarlett my predicament and she suggested parking at Boat O’ Brig and running out n back to Aberlour thus driving over some of the course and running the rest. Aye, running the hardest bit twice but then, what better training could I ask for? http://www.outrunspeyside.co.uk/ Running caps off to Scarlett, she said she’d have given me a lift down if I’d come in a tad earlier; nice to find a shop willing to put themselves out for customers!!

GEAR: INOV-8 Roclite 212 GTX, x-socks Run, Haglofs full length intense tights, Icebreakers 150 boxers, shockabsorber B4490, Salomon EXO tee, Gore Magnitude AS vest (taken off after 30 mins),Montane featherlite waterproof jacket, waterproof trousers, INOV-8 gaitors, Nike hat, Fetch Everyone buff, Salomon XA20 rucksack and I carried 1.5 L water with elete and various gels, Garmin 305 Forerunner, 2Gb Nano (Ben Fogle playlist)

Image

After driving down a single track which would have resulted in a 3 mile reverse if I’d actually met another vehicle(!) I found the carpark no bother and due to the weather, elected to wear the gaiters under my waterproof trousers and hoped that the Goretex offroad shoes would do the business.

Holy cr@p it was wet! Torrential at times and as the rain pelted me and then occasionally came down in a water wall as the trees above me gave way to it’s weight, I reminded myself that today was my birthday and I could have been doing almost anything and I’d chosen to do THIS.

The route into Ben Aigen was muddy but running uphill against a veritable river was where the off-roaders came into their own. I do love INOV-8s. It was sharper ascent on the way towards Craigellachie and I kept in mind that for everything I ran up, it’d be a coast down on the way back.

I used my lift the right knee for 5 steps, then switch legs and always lift from the knee, technique to ensure I wasn’t muscling up the hills with my calves. Oh the strategies I’ve had to develop to share the load away from the normal muscles, but it seemed to work. If I keep my head down I can get up some fairly long climbs by just concentrating on the counting knee-lifts distraction!

I passed a group of European hikers- how did I know this? Because some had Fjallraven packs and basically, these are not really well known over here. They seemed surprised to see me practically wading passed in my waterproofs!

Unfortunately, the road down into the town was a gradual decline so I knew I was in for a tough return. The Garmin said 6.55 miles as I turned over the bridge into Craigellachie carpark, so I elected to not go on to Aberlour. I used the toilets (nice n clean) and checked that I had plenty water (I did) and then started the slow return (INOV-8s on road, och well). I met the hikers about 2 miles out, just after having clambered down a steep trail to take a picture of a red squirrel, we had a quick chat and I let them know they were very close and that there was a hotel/pub at the corner. They were German sounding 🙂

Image

The mist was well and truly down and I was feeling a bit cold as I made my way back up and through the Ben Aigen trails, it was beautiful though and there is always a really great smell from the forest when it’s raining. The down parts were too wet n steep to benefit from, so I was still pulling a 10.30 minute/mile or slower as I approached the Boat O Brig again. I ran round the corner and up towards the weak bridge, just to get my mileage to nearer 15. DONE! And I shivered into some nice warm icebreaker 260 and 340 tops before taking Scarlett’s advised route straight through to Keith.

It was definitely worth the recce to see this bit of the route. I know now that I need to really pace myself in the early stages and minimize use of the calves over the routes peak.

Next time: Fochabers to Buckie……and back! (20 miles roundtrip).

Another Rescinded Entry

http://www.lakeland100.com/the-lakeland-50

It was with a pursed lip and a Grrr-Argh that I officially rescinded my entry to Lakelands 50 earlier this week.

Originally entered in the blazing gusto a.k.a. completing the Glen Ogle 33 (er, 32, er depending on your route, 31…) mile ultramarathon last year, injury and lack of training have combined to give me another DNS. Now I’m not interested in any incredulous BS regarding DNS versus DNF. The simple fact is that many races (the interesting ones) require you to pay your money (in this instance, quite a lot) up to a year in advance. Can I tell the future? Nope. I certainly thought I would be well trained by this stage and even after sustaining a fairly nasty achilles strain at the start of the year, I STILL thought I would recover in time.

Hope sprung eternal when, having four months away from anything resembling training, I still thought I could walk the route and make all the Checkpoints. I even found some fellow-walkers aiming to just complete and who offered a shoulder to waddle with, across the fifty mile route. But lets not kid ourselves, this isn’t a fifty mile stroll round a park, it’s in the Lake District over hills, dales and some fairly mountainous stuff! Having just managed round a couple of half marathons, I’m not going to risk anything by putting myself through a course which might just set me back even further.

Having said that, there was still a large part of me that wanted to try. God loves a trier and I’m definitely one of those. I would have made it round, not sure about how many pieces I would’ve been in. So Lakelands 50, I thank thee and please accept my £70 entry fee as testament to good intention but a tick in the Did Not Start or Do Not be Stupid as I’m calling it. I’m assuming the hills and the event will be there next year

That said, I AM willing to put myself through 36.5 miles and the ‘real’ 33 mile Glen Ogle course, later in the year. But I’ll be doing it properly, with (gasp) training, route recces, nutrition experiments and new kit. Gotta love an excuse for new running gear.

OK, don’t kill me but….

ImageImageImageImageImage

Whoops. Rescinding entries. Coped with by applying the Retail therapy Plaster